Independent Practice: Lines of Thought Workshop

This post is explain and show what I did during the Lines of Thought Workshop, this exhibit was to show pieces of work from various artists from across time, some of these works included Michelangelo, Leonardo and Picasso. The exhibit will remain at Hull University’s Brynmor Jones Library till 28th February 2017 before the exhibit is moved to one of the other two locations before it is returned to the National History Museum in London.

We start the workshop by talking with the exhibit managers before she set us a task of looking around the exhibit and looking at the art pieces that drew our attention without looking at information and trying to work out why we found it interesting for an hour. Afterwards we then went went round the gallery with the manger visiting each piece discussing why we found them interesting. I found several of these pieces very interesting as they not only showed what the artists were thinking at the time, as most of the works there were actually prototype sketches or idea that the artists had drawn down so they wouldn’t forget or wanted to try something out. An excellent example of this is Michelangelo’s sketches of the design for the Madonna and Child.

The works that were shown at the Lines of thought exhibit were incredible and truly inspiring, it showed me that regardless of ones art style you can still portray your own ideas effectively and clearly. This has not only inspired but also encouraged me to keep going at with my projects and developing my art skills and not matter what others think about my skills don’t let put me down or make me over confident.

Eventually we left the exhibit and went to another room were we were given photocopies of the art pieces and told to sketch over some of the photo copies with tracing paper. Then with a piece of card we used a pen on the other side of the tracing paper to trace the drawings onto the card to create our own piece of art. With this done we could either keep the art pieces we had created or give them for a collaboration pieces that all the art workshops were putting together.

These three images are of me comparing the traces on the piece of card against the original drawings to see how well I had trace from the photocopies, several other students at the Lines of thought workshop also did this at the suggestion of our guide. We did this not only to see how well our own attempts at tracing the art were but to show how even when coping someone else’s style it will never be exactly the same and will always have your own creative flair to it. Next we returned to the small room that we were using for our drawings and were told that we were going to use the photocopies now to make a collage that all the workshop was putting together. The rule were simple we could do what ever we wanted with the photocopies from cutting fragments out to covering so much of the photo copies with tipex and felt tip as long as we kept all the work connected in someway when we stuck them on the wall.

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This is the trace art that we put together using tracing paper, a pencil and a pen.

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The pieces above are the main bits that I contributed to Collaboration in the Lines of Thought exhibit. Please note that no all of the cut offs in the images are my own, their are also done by the same people who were in my group. Examples of my contributions are brick road above, The Big Smile, the hanging mace above the and the explosive, the turtle shell helmet, etc.

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One thought on “Independent Practice: Lines of Thought Workshop

  1. Pingback: Year Overview: Year 3 Blog Content | amtanimator

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